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Titanic's

A la Carte Restaurant   Return to Diagram


            

Titanic's 154 seat a la carte restaurant was located on B deck and connected to the Parisian Café. This was considered the premiere restaurant on Titanic and is where Wallace Hartley and his violinists strolled around the room playing while people dined. It required reservations due to its popularity. The 1st class main dining room meals were included in the price of the expensive first class tickets, but if you dined at the a la carte restaurant, it was an extra charge. It was actually privately owned and the employees of the restaurant did not work for the White Star Line, they worked for the owner, Gaspare Antonio Gatti, affectionately know by the passengers as "Luigi;" he also owned the Parisian Cafe.

There was a staff of 66 employees including chefs, waiters, kitchen staff, a Maitre D’ and 2 cashiers, all French and Italian nationals that ran both the A la carte restaurant and the Parisian Café. After the sinking of Titanic, only 3 of the staff survived, the two female cashiers and the Maitre D’ (Paul Mauge) who jumped from the boat deck into a lifeboat being lowered (boat 13) and landed on a woman in the boat breaking both of her legs. As the lowering boat passed another deck, Titanic crew members tried to pull him out but he was able to fight them off. One survivor account speaks of this incident saying that the passengers in boat 13 had strongly considered throwing Mauge into the water and called him a coward. Mauge later testified at the British Inquiry that the a la carte staff was prevented from going to the boat deck by stewards and since he was dressed as a passenger he thought he could board a boat.

       

"Luigi" (above left) who did not survive, and Paul Mauge

Consulted sources: peggywirgau.com/2014/09/17/titanics-most-exclusive-restaurant/                                                                                                                                                     The Loss of the SS Titanic, 1912, Lawrence Beesly   


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