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Titanic's

Third Class Deck Space Return to Diagram


     

(Above left) Titanic's "poop deck." (Above right) A photo taken from the 2nd class deck space shows the aft well deck and 3rd class passengers up on the poop deck.

A deck level photo of the poop deck with a view of the stern docking bridge and various ventilation funnels. Note the passengers benches.

(Above) Third class passengers enjoying the sun on deck. (Image: Father Browne Collection)

Third class passengers had two locations to access if they wished to go on deck. The stern (rear of the ship) area, also referred to as the "poop deck," and the forward well deck up at the front of the ship. The 3rd class passengers were separated from each other in the sense that married couples and single women and children were housed aft in the ship, and single men were housed forward near the well deck.

Unlike the movie "Titanic," where Jack and Rose stood at the extreme bow of the ship, passengers were not allowed forward (forecastle area) of the breakwater on the well deck. That forward forecastle or  "fo'c's'le" (pronounced fok-sul) was an dangerous area.; the anchors and anchor chains, bollards, cranes, cables and other machinery were  located there. In rough seas a passenger would be swept right off the deck where Jack and Rose stood in the movie.

 So, the women, children and families would have had the poop deck and aft well deck to themselves and the single men would have had the forward well deck and aft section of the forecastle to themselves.

Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 
Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 

 


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