index sitemap advanced
site search by freefind

 

 


Titanic's Third Class Smoking Room Return to Diagram


The 3rd class Smoking Room was located on C Deck port side at the stern of the ship. It was adjacent to but not connected to the 3rd class general room. This room was is in extreme contrast to the first class smoking room, but it's quite a pretty room just the same. The paneling was stained pine and the benches were made of teak, there was a bar in this room (right foreground) that served beer and various ales. (for a charge of course)

A good example of the stereotyping of immigrants in this time period is revealed with this room, the 3rd class general room, and the 3rd class dining room with the lack of upholstery. This was intentional due to the assumption of foreign nationals possibly carrying disease, similar to requiring these people to receive quick medical checks upon boarding Titanic and more extensive medical exams at Ellis Island which is where they were ferried to immediately upon arrival in New York. The Titanic disaster was the only exception to this law; the rescue ship Carpathia received special permission to not board the surviving 3rd class passengers on the Ellis Island ferry upon arrival in New York Harbor; taking into consideration what they had just gone through. The surviving 3rd class passengers remained aboard Carpathia while US Public Health doctors came on board and gave them medical evaluations.

The reason for the lack of carpeting and the bare wood planking is obvious with the spittoon next to the table and what appears to be tobacco stains on the floor boards in front of the bench. This room was reported to have been cheery and lively at night. 

Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 
Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 

Interesting medical exam information
 
The medical inspection at Ellis Island began the very moment the immigrants began ascending the stairs to the Registry Room. U.S. Public Health Service Doctors stationed at the top of the stairs watched carefully for shortness of breath or signs of heart trouble as the immigrants climbed up the steps hefting their baggage. U.S. Public Health Service doctors sometimes had only six seconds to scan each immigrant during the line inspection. If a doctor found any indication of disease, he marked the shoulder or lapel of an immigrant's clothing with chalk: "L" for lameness, "E" for eyes, for example. Marked immigrants, some of whom had received several of these mystifying letters, were removed from the inspection line and led to special examination rooms. There a doctor would check them for the ailment indicated by the chalk mark and give them a quick overall physical. Many had to be sent to the hospital for observation and care. Patients who recovered were usually allowed to land. Others, whose ailments were incurable or disabling, were sent back to their ports of origin.

Source: US National Park Service (www.NPS.gov) 

 


Return to Diagram   Home