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Titanic's

Second Class Cabins Return to Diagram


The second class cabins aboard Titanic were by no means as large and opulent as the first class cabins, but were indeed quite comfortable. The travelers in second class consisted of tourists, clergy, university professors, and authors; basically people of moderate income that would be considered today as the middle class population. The second class cabins ranged in price according to size. A second class ticket on Titanic cost anywhere between 20 to 80 pounds, which would be equivalent to $1000 to $1800 today.

"A typical Second Class stateroom was furnished with a mahogany bunk bed, a matching wardrobe or two and a comfortable sofa that converted to a bunk bed if needed. A fold-away washbasin cabinet also doubled as a dresser and provided some additional storage space. As with First Class, steward call buttons were also provided in every room and passengers enjoyed that famous White Star Line service and hospitality." Source: www.titanic-ii.com/second-class-cabin

Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 
Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.



Read more: Titantic Photographs by Fr. Francis Browne - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/04/titanic/#ixzz3UYv6siWg
 

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